Rural Madison

A 501(c)(3) non-profit citizen’s organization dedicated to thoughtful planning and policies for sustainable growth, stewardship of our natural, cultural and historical resources and the protection of the rural character of our region.

Author: Staff/Contributed (page 1 of 11)

Hops & Homestead Festival

1st Annual Hops & Homestead Festival

October 28, 2017, 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Bald Top Brewing Company
1830 Thrift Road
Madison, Virginia, VA 22727

 

Bald Top Brewing Co. and Rural Madison Inc. are proud to present the 2017 Hops & Homestead Festival, featuring local seasonal produce, fine arts, hand made and hand decorated crafts, homesteading and agricultural demonstrations, live entertainment, food, and children’s activities. Get more information on our event page.

Green & Clean Day April 22

Make Every Day Earth Day!Bring your recyclables to the Transfer Station on Earth Day, April 22nd, 2017 to help us green and clean Madison!

Recycle up to 4 rimless, passenger vehicle-size used tires per household for free (no tractor tires, please)!

Free tree seedlings (white dogwood, indigo, white oak, white pine or sugar maple) for the 1st 150 vehicles.

Enter the sweepstakes to win fabulous prizes from local businesses, including Orange Madison Cooperative, MWP Supply, Inc., Yoder’s Country Market and Wild Birds Unlimited, Inc. (you must get your tickets at the event, but you do not need to be present to win).

Green and Clean Day April 22, 2017

Download printable Green and Clean Day flyer

 

Wendell Berry at the Center for a Livable Future

Media Advisory

Wendell Berry to Speak at CLF 20th Anniversary Celebration

Wendell Berry at the Center For A Livable Future

click to enlarge

The Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF) is kicking off its 20th Anniversary Celebration next week with events featuring award-winning author and farmer Wendell Berry and investigative journalist and author Eric Schlosser. Members of the media are invited to attend the events below or watch the live stream at: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/johnshopkinsu

The World Ending Fire: A Conversation with Wendell Berry 

Eric Schlosser, author and investigative journalist, and Wendell Berry, award-winning novelist, poet, and farmer, will discuss Mr. Berry’s writings and ideas about a wide range of topics, including agriculture, agrarian life, the pleasures of good food, and our food system.

When: Wednesday, December 7, 2016, at Noon-1 PM (EST)

Where: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
615 N. Wolfe Street, W1214 (Sheldon Hall)
Baltimore, MD

Notes: This event is not open to the public and space is limited. Please direct media RSVPs to dmilbur3@jhu.edu. The event live stream can be viewed here.

 

The Thought of Limits in a Prodigal Age

Wendell Berry will premier a new essay, “The Thought of Limits in a Prodigal Age,” during the 17th Annual Dodge Lecture. The Dodge Lecture was established in 1999 to honor Dr. Edward Dodge and his late wife Nancy for their generous support of the Center for a Livable Future.

When: Thursday, December 8, 2016, at 12:30-1:30 PM (EST)

Where: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
615 N. Wolfe Street, E2014 (Sommer Hall)
Baltimore, MD

Notes: This event is open to the public, but space is limited. Please direct media RSVPs to dmilbur3@jhu.edu. The event live stream can be viewed here.

 

About CLF: 

Since 1996 the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future has been addressing some of the most pressing issues in the food system while advancing public health and protecting the environment. As an interdisciplinary academic center based within the Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Center is a leader in public health research, education, policy, and advocacy that is dedicated to building a healthier, more equitable, and resilient food system.

To join our mailing list for future events and news releases, please visit:

http://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/johns-hopkins-center-for-a-livable-future/about/contact_us/clfnews_listserv.html

For more information or to RSVP, please contact: Darcy Milburn, Communications Coordinator at (978) 998-9319 or dmilbur3@jhu.edu.

Poverty Taskforce

Many of our neighbors are struggling day-to-day with the effects of both acute and chronic poverty. Malnutrition, physical & mental health, education, employment and crime are issues that 18.3% of children in Madison are faced with every day. Please join the conversation and help raise awareness about how poverty drives negative outcomes for our most vulnerable citizens.


Madison County Poverty Taskforce


Madison County Poverty Taskforce

 

Home – Poverty Taskforce

We are very fortunate to live in an exceptionally beautiful area with a relatively low crime rate, good schools, and world-class recreational opportunities. Many of our Madison neighbors, however, are struggling day-to-day with the effects of both acute and chronic poverty. Malnutrition, physical & mental health, education, employment and crime are issues that 18.3% of our children …

Biomimicry vs. Biomockery

By Ruth Glendinning

Humans are biological creatures and we do best when we are in alignment with our environments. Ultimately, as noted in an earlier post, this comes down to the question of whether we are creating an egosystem or an ecosystem:

An ego-system is structured to satisfy shareholder wants and to privatize decision-making. Financial capital is valued above other contributions, costs are not fully disclosed and transactions lack transparency.

In the ecosystem, all stakeholders are committed to the shared wellbeing of the community. All forms of capital are valued, all costs are considered and transactions are transparent.

Are we creating and valuing our communities in ways that recognize & emulate the natural rooted patterns of thriving? Or using models that utilize the ‘greenwash‘ model in which the appearance of a commitment to community-focused solutions is used to cover up the fact that the true outcome plays out in an opposite manner to the goal of the announced initiative. In other words, are developers claiming biomimicry when, in truth, they are practicing biomockery?

Biomimicry vs. Biomockery

Humans are biological creatures and we do best when we are in alignment with our environments. Ultimately, as noted in an earlier post, this comes down to the question of whether we are creating an egosystem or an ecosystem: An ego-system is structured to satisfy shareholder wants and to privatize decision-making.

Doubts About the Promised Bounty of Genetically Modified Crops

The controversy over genetically modified crops has long focused on largely unsubstantiated fears that they are unsafe to eat.

But an extensive examination by The New York Times indicates that the debate has missed a more basic problem — genetic modification in the United States and Canada has not accelerated increases in crop yields or led to an overall reduction in the use of chemical pesticides.

An analysis by The Times using United Nations data showed that the United States and Canada have gained no discernible advantage in yields — food per acre — when measured against Western Europe, a region with comparably modernized agricultural producers like France and Germany. Also, a recent National Academy of Sciences report found that “there was little evidence” that the introduction of genetically modified crops in the United States had led to yield gains beyond those seen in conventional crops.

The promise of genetic modification was twofold: By making crops immune to the effects of weedkillers and inherently resistant to many pests, they would grow so robustly that they would become indispensable to feeding the world’s growing population, while also requiring fewer applications of sprayed pesticides.

Doubts About the Promised Bounty of Genetically Modified Crops

Figures from the United States Department of Agriculture show herbicide use skyrocketing in soybeans, a leading G.M. crop, growing by two and a half times in the last two decades, at a time when planted acreage of the crop grew by less than a third.

Bayer and Monsanto to merge in mega-deal that could reshape world’s food supply

via Dave Pell

“Bayer in the U.S. is known largely for its pharmaceuticals, with scientists who developed modern Aspirin and Alka-Seltzer.” And you might need a little of both to process the company’s latest deal; a massive $66 billion acquisition of Monsanto. Here’s more on the deal that could reshape the world’s food supply. (If Bayer/Monsanto’s pesticides make you sick, don’t worry. Bayer/Monsanto has a drug to help you. Synergy!)

 

Bayer in the U.S. is known largely for its pharmaceuticals, with scientists who developed modern Aspirin and Alka-Seltzer. But the deal would pivot the 117,000-employee company more towards its farm-targeting business in agriculture chemicals, crop supplies and compounds that kill bugs and weeds.

The Washington Post has the full story..

Bayer and Monsanto to merge in mega-deal that could reshape world’s food supply

The German chemical company Bayer said it will take over U.S. seed giant Monsanto to become one of the world’s biggest agriculture conglomerates. The $66 billion deal – the largest corporate mega-mergers in a year full of them – could reshape the development of seeds and pesticides necessary to fueling the planet’s food supply.

A quick question for our Madison County friends

Do you live, work or play in Madison County? If so, how would you rate your Internet service?

If you’ll take just a second to let us know, we’ll compile the answers and share them with the Madison County Board of Supervisors Broadband Committee. In the meantime, you can track the results here.

Create your own user feedback survey

Unbroken Ground: Revolutions Start From the Bottom

The film Unbroken Ground explores four areas of agriculture that aim to change our relationship to the land and oceans. Most of our food is produced using methods that reduce biodiversity, decimate soil and contribute to climate change. We believe our food can and should be a part of the solution to the environmental crisis – grown, harvested and produced in ways that restore our land, water and wildlife. The film tells the story of four groups that are pioneers in the fields of regenerative agriculture, regenerative grazing, diversified crop development and restorative fishing.

Enjoy this full length feature and join us in finding a solution to the environmental crisis through food!

The Land Institute is a non-profit research, education, and policy organization dedicated to sustainable agriculture based in Salina, Kansas, United States. Their goal is to develop an agricultural system based on perennial crops that “has the ecological stability of the prairie and a grain yield comparable to that from annual crops”

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